Haman and Esther

Haman was a vizier in the court of Xerxes. He, because of the Jews not bowing to him hatched a plan to wipe off the Jewish race. His plans were seen by Queen Esther and she used tact and diplomacy to foil the efforts of Haman. The King spared the Jews and took Haman to the gallows.

Esther as an Idiom means using tact and diplomacy to solve an impending issue. My mother became an Esther when she was mitigating the property discord between me and my sisters.

Haman as an idiom means falling prey to an evil plot hatched by an individual. The Haman that my sisters hatched against my wife did not work.

Two Idioms From the New Testament

Lilies of the Field
Christ said: ‘look at the lilies of the field; they are more beautiful than Solomon’s Robes. They neither sow nor reap; yet your heavenly father takes care of them.’ Lilies of the field as an idiom means, being free from worries. My experience with God is Lilies from the field.

Temple
Christ was discussing with Pharisees and Sadducees about his own resurrection. He said: ‘the temple will be thrown apart and it will be rebuilt after the 3rd day.’ Christ died and rose up the third day. The temple as an idiom means a body of disbelief. My views on Christ as Lord, Messiah and Savior are not a temple.

Fictional Narratives

Cleansing the Temple
This is the only time that Jesus got angry. When he came to the temple, to his consternation he found that the temple was full of marketers and gamblers. He took a whip and with all fury drove them all out and said: ‘my father’s house is a house of prayer but you have made it a den of thieves. Cleansing the temple as an idiom means a body free of vices. In personal life cleansing the temple is not an easy task.


Evening Epiphany

Light broke out into a prose of poems ….scarlet …..orange….pink and purple….there’s an ark there embedded in the clouds, a Noah’s ark….there’s a fire belching monster ….there I see a gargoyle….evening is quiet, tranquil poem…..fairies were nattering in awesome splendor….few were streaking across the sky in magnificent pulchritude ….the flame of the forest with its red flowers shone as a music of color….meaning of beauty lies in the art of nature.

Rain an Epiphany
Zeus roared his motorcycle across the sky…A fetish of pink X-rayed the sky….The clouds were swollen ash ….then it started drizzling….the cold breeze stuck my cheeks as tempting cheese. The falling of rain on the roof resembled the sounds of horses trotting….the rain fizzled out and what remained was a quiet silence ….rain is pathos of nature ….

Idioms

Iceberg
Well all know the story how Titanic sank when it was hit by an iceberg. Iceberg as an Idiom means an enormous destructive force. The pandemic Corona has become an iceberg.

Tabernacle
Tabernacle in the Old Testament is a tent where worshippers worshipped God and where the presence of God (Shekina) was felt. In the New Testament Tabernacle became the body offered to God without blemish or sin. As an Idiom, tabernacle means being free from sin or wrongdoing. Being the Tabernacle is a difficult task.

April 7th 2020

An Idiom
The parable of the Seed is an all familiar parable of Jesus Christ. It tells of the seed planted on good soil ultimately yields good fruit. The Seed planted in good soil yields good fruit as an idiom means hard work and diligence will in the end yield rich dividends.

Evening Epiphany
I watch the evening appear as a painting of impressionism. Nature is a splendid gift of an artist creator, God. The mango tree outside my house is plump with rich fruit. Stray birds are caressing the sky. A butterfly does a symphony waltz. Poems of clouds scatter n the sky singing the epic chorus of Hallelujah.

An Epiphany
The sky is a stained, grey glass, moody like a romantic heroine. Dolphins of design floated in the sky. Rain is pouring now as streams of consciousness of a decadent hymn. Raining is striking on the roof, pitter patter, an impromptu harmony of a blues serenade. Feathers of the tree floated in the gentle rhythm of a musical breeze.

Jesus Walking On Water

The story of Jesus walking on water is very familiar. It happened when Jesus was on land and the disciples on water on a boat. The storm raged with wild fury and the disciples cried out: ‘master save us’. Then Jesus walked on water. Jesus walking on water as an idiom means getting over a difficulty with immense ease. Some problems can be solved as Jesus walking on water.

Idioms from Judaism

Jonah in the Old Testament, a prophet was asked by God to go to Nineveh to preach to the people to repent from their sins. Instead of going to Nineveh, Jonah went to Tarshish. During the Journey the ship encountered a storm, and the travelers in the ship, being pagans cast lots and the cards fell on Jonah. When they approached Jonah, he told them to throw him into the sea. There he was swallowed by a whale and had to spent 3 nights in its belly. On the third day the whale spit him onto dry land. Jonah went to Tarshish and the people repented and God chose not to punish them.


Jonah going to Tarshish

Jonah going to Tarshish as an idiom means falling into a trap. I have had experiences in my life where I encountered Jonah going to Tarshish.


Jonah being swallowed by a Whale

Jonah being swallowed by a Whale as an Idiom means being surmounted by temporary difficulties which will soon pass away. Yes Jonah being swallowed by a whale is happening to me in my life.

Repentant Tarshish
Repentant Tarshish as an idiom means, to be sincere and to have good feelings towards others. Yes, we have to be the repentant Tarshish.

Two Idioms

COVID 19
The outbreak of the COVID 19 virus was a man made one, in the laboratories of the roguish, diabolic country China. The virus was created to destabilize the international Economy. When the shares of international companies fell, China was able to buy them at paltry prices. Many countries of Europe and Asia and America became victims of this clandestine subversion. COVID 19 as an idiom means destabilization of world economies. China should be declared as a COVID 19 thug State and all nations should embargo its goods.


Bitter to Sweet

This is an idiom I have birthed from Judaism. When the Israelites after their liberation from Egypt spend their life in the desert and started grumbling to Moses their liberator that the waters tasted bitter. Then God instructed Moses to strike the rock with a Shepherd’s Crook. When he did, the waters turned sweet. Bitter to Sweet as an Idiom means life becoming better after a period of trials and tribulations.

Idioms and Neologisms

Idioms

Bail the Dead
Bail the dead as an idiom means finding a solution for a recurring problem. Will the Corona virus become a Bail the Dead?

Peacocking
Peacocking as an idiom means socializing with people who are celebrities. He peacocks with the literati.

Neologisms

Prosperovorous
Prosperovorus comes from the Shakespearean character Prospero and Omnivorous. Prosperovorous is a person who wins a Jackpot in a windfall drawing. I hope to become a Prosperovrous.
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Bum-A-Nomics
Bum-A-Nomics is plunging an economy downhill due to faulty policies. The government of India’s economic policies are a Bum-A-Nomics.

Biblical Idioms

Biblical Idioms
These idioms are coined from the Book—Exodus. Moses the liberator went up to the mountains to talk to God. He returned after 40 days. When he came back he saw that the Israelites had made a golden calf and were merry making with it. He, in a fit of anger, threw the tablet of stone containing the Ten Commandments. And it broke. The tablet of stone as an idiom means seething with anger. Golden Calf as an idiom means idolatry. God became the tablets of Stone when he dealt with Sodom and Gomorrah. Most religions indulge in the Golden Calf.