Idioms and Neologisms

Idioms

Bail the Dead
Bail the dead as an idiom means finding a solution for a recurring problem. Will the Corona virus become a Bail the Dead?

Peacocking
Peacocking as an idiom means socializing with people who are celebrities. He peacocks with the literati.

Neologisms

Prosperovorous
Prosperovorus comes from the Shakespearean character Prospero and Omnivorous. Prosperovorous is a person who wins a Jackpot in a windfall drawing. I hope to become a Prosperovrous.
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Bum-A-Nomics
Bum-A-Nomics is plunging an economy downhill due to faulty policies. The government of India’s economic policies are a Bum-A-Nomics.

Biblical Idioms

Biblical Idioms
These idioms are coined from the Book—Exodus. Moses the liberator went up to the mountains to talk to God. He returned after 40 days. When he came back he saw that the Israelites had made a golden calf and were merry making with it. He, in a fit of anger, threw the tablet of stone containing the Ten Commandments. And it broke. The tablet of stone as an idiom means seething with anger. Golden Calf as an idiom means idolatry. God became the tablets of Stone when he dealt with Sodom and Gomorrah. Most religions indulge in the Golden Calf.

March 15th 2020

March 15, 2020

Yesterday night I had a strange dream of being attacked by an unknown person. I looked up at the dream dictionary and found out that being attacked means the fear and insecurities of the dreamer. Anyway the dream was not a pleasant one. I hope unlucky days will soon vanish and the grace of God Jehovah Jesus will pervade with me with LUCK.

I developed a new figure of speech called (thought (a) phor). For example: the word liberal has the antonyms strict and also conservative. Such a word which has two different antonyms is called a thoughtaphor.

I read into the Bible and I have coined two new idioms. Long after the death of the Pharaoh and after the reign of Joseph, the country was ruled by a Pharaoh who ill-treated the Jews. God started sending the 7 plagues in-order to let the Israelites go. But the Pharaoh remained adamant as ever. Then God asked the Semites to kill a goat or sheep and smear the blood on their doors and in the night the hand of God will visit the country and kill the entire first one born except the Jews. Smearing the door with blood means victory over one’s enemies. Yes, God will smear my door with blood. God also asked the captives in Egypt to have feast with unleavened bread known as the festival of the Passover. The Festival of the Passover means joy and wondrous rejoicing after a period of great trials and hardships in life.

Biblical Joseph as an Idiom

We all know how Joseph, hated by his brothers out of jealousy, sold him to the Egyptians. There he became a supervisor in Potiphar’s household. When Potiphar’s wife tried to seduce the handsome Joseph, he did not relent. She accused him of molestation and Potiphar threw him into jail. In prison he was able to successfully interpret the dreams put forth by the baker and the wine maker. Later on he was called by the Pharaoh to interpret his dreams which he did ebulliently. The pharaoh placed him as the second in command next to him and asked him to stockpile food for the coming drought. Joseph as an idiom stands for the evolution of triumph or victory after a period of disaster and ruin. How I wish for a period of Joseph to happen in my life.

Sacrifice as an Idiom

We all know the story of Abraham who was tested by God Jehovah Jesus to sacrifice his son at the altar. When he was about to sacrifice his son, God said: ‘stop; you have kept your steadfast faith in me; sacrifice the ram entangled in the bush.’ Sacrifice as an idiom stands for good things happening in life and good things yet to come after a period of downs in one’s life. My enduring faith, trust, and hope in God—Jehovah Jesus will have a positive outcome as sacrifice.