From Discourse to Dialogue

A discourse is a formal method of speech or writing where the speaker or writer tries to goad content and meaning upon the listener or reader. A dialogue on the other hand is an informal speech aimed at constructing meaning which adheres to democratic norms. This article would like to focus on various forms of dialogue that remain embedded in the ritual of life.

First of all I would like to start with a coercive dialogue. A coercive dialogue is one of its kind where the speaker or writer tries to enforce meaning upon the other. In a coercive dialogue, meaning is autocratic-centered and there is very little constructivism. I would like to use an example from modern day politics. Trump forced the countries of the Middle East to sever their ties with Qatar. This form of diplomatic whip ruling is coercive-centered dialogue.

Secondly, I would like to introduce a democratic dialogue. A democratic dialogue is a form of conversational apology where the speaker or writer follows what I would describe in Buddha’s line of thought called the Middle Way. An example of a democratic dialogue can be illustrated with an example from Indian History. Mahatma Gandhi made the famous Dandi March where he and his followers in order to protest against the salt tax, marched to the sea and made salt.
Thirdly I would like to introduce a form of dialogue called persuasive dialogue. The aim of this form of dialogue is to win the attention and favor of the reader or listener. This form of dialogue is famous in the Philosophy of rhetoric. The aim of this form of dialogue is to flatter, seduce, inflame, excite and generate much attention. This form of dialogue can be found in films, music, dance and drama. This type of dialogue is also generated by demagogues.

The fourth of a dialogue is coined in a neologism psycho-log. It is a form of dialogue which takes place between a client and a lawyer, a therapist, a counselor, a psychiatrist. It follows an intense period of questions and answers. Sometimes the dialogue attains a therapeutic tone. The dialogue is a mixture of democracy and autocracy.

The fifth form of dialogue is streams of consciousness dialogue. In steams of consciousness writing, the normal rules of grammar, syntax and punctuation are avoided. The writer writes in a free association of thought. The master of streams of consciousness writing was James Joyce who wrote the epic novel—Ulysses. Reading Joyce one is filled with profound poetry of emotion. Virginia Wolf is also another acclaimed writer of streams of consciousness. Within Streams of Consciousness, reading becomes a poetic metaphor of thought.