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April 5th 2019

The day was a passing Epiphany, a poem being unrolled. I am enjoying the easy-go-lucky -time of Summer Holidays.

Morning was a mystic poem—a sonata of celestial colors. Monks rowed across the sky in sparkling splendor. I thank God Jesus for all the blessings given. The son rose as a poet reciting a verse.

I have started reading the Gospel of Mark and I came across the incident where a woman who had an issue of blood touched the garments of Jesus and was healed. Jesus on realizing some energy had gone out of him asked who had touched him. The woman replied it is she. Then Jesus blessed her.

My writing has led to the discovery of the self and I want to harmonize my fictional self with the real self.

I recall the words of Christ—if you honor me: the Father in heaven will honor you.
Lord Jehovah Jesus: Yes what I yes on earth in Heaven.
I rejoice as the Prodigal Son who has returned to the Father and whom the Father Forgave and accepted without any conditions.
Lord Jehovah Jesus: windfall my purse with a gain of 20000 Rupees today. My wallet has become dry. Water it with a good some of money.

My thoughts are drifting to two art movements in History: Romanticism and Imagism.

Romanticism
Romanticism according to William Wordsworth is the spontaneous overflow of feeling. Sight, Smell, taste and touch become tropoligized into aesthetic artifacts. Romanticism is a poetic sensibility, the art of transforming into a ritual of poetic beauty. Has romanticism become decadent? Romanticism is an art to appreciate nature. Here is a romantic epiphany. Dawn Started Moving with the lovers communing; colors nuzzling fawns, surging tourbillion glowing passion; eternity flies as Sadhus (birds) in white, unveiling time on mystic flight; brook of beauty running through gurgling moksha (salvation) all the way through; swaying pebbles glistening karmic odes, samsara (cycle of rebirth) meanders pilgrimage blues; beyond mundane life of aching pain and deadly strife, Heraclitus is moving from flux to feeling.
Imagism

Another art movement that fascinated me is Imagism founded by Eliot. He defined imagism as an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time. Words in imagism become poetic ornaments. Some examples of Imagism are: The eye of the night shone in mystic glory. Poems gently float across the sky. I played the guitar on her body. Psyche, you beautiful ornament, you are an epiphany in rendition. Rain in Kerala is the heart of monsoon. I poured ecstasy into her body. Memory is a photograph in the album of the mind. Waves in the sky rolled like a hyperbole. I submerged in her lake of passion. The unconscious is an odyssey of the mind. Beauty blooms in a color. Echo is music of the earth. Art is the music of making love.

Idioms and Neologisms

Idioms

Bail the Dead
Bail the dead as an idiom means finding a solution for a recurring problem. Will the Corona virus become a Bail the Dead?

Peacocking
Peacocking as an idiom means socializing with people who are celebrities. He peacocks with the literati.

Neologisms

Prosperovorous
Prosperovorus comes from the Shakespearean character Prospero and Omnivorous. Prosperovorous is a person who wins a Jackpot in a windfall drawing. I hope to become a Prosperovrous.
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Bum-A-Nomics
Bum-A-Nomics is plunging an economy downhill due to faulty policies. The government of India’s economic policies are a Bum-A-Nomics.

An Idiom from Judaism

This idiom made a frame in my mind as I was reading the captivity of the Jews in Egypt. In the contemporary world the Jews became enslaved and made captive by the mad Hitler. The Jews are races who are travelers in the Wilderness. Traveler in the Wilderness as an Idiom means someone who is plagued by earthly troubles and sorrows. Oh God Jehovah Jesus make my victory while I am a traveler in the Wilderness.

An Idiom from the Bible

When Moses and the Israelites were fleeing from the Pharaoh after the Pharaoh letting them go, the pharaoh became hardhearted and sent his army after them. Then people of Israel grumbled: it would have been better for us to be slaves in Egypt rather than Corpses in the Wilderness. Slaves in Egypt and Corpses in the Wilderness are an idiom meaning choosing an alternative that is difficult and tiresome but something which will read rich dividends in the end.

Biblical Idioms

Biblical Idioms
These idioms are coined from the Book—Exodus. Moses the liberator went up to the mountains to talk to God. He returned after 40 days. When he came back he saw that the Israelites had made a golden calf and were merry making with it. He, in a fit of anger, threw the tablet of stone containing the Ten Commandments. And it broke. The tablet of stone as an idiom means seething with anger. Golden Calf as an idiom means idolatry. God became the tablets of Stone when he dealt with Sodom and Gomorrah. Most religions indulge in the Golden Calf.

March 15th 2020

March 15, 2020

Yesterday night I had a strange dream of being attacked by an unknown person. I looked up at the dream dictionary and found out that being attacked means the fear and insecurities of the dreamer. Anyway the dream was not a pleasant one. I hope unlucky days will soon vanish and the grace of God Jehovah Jesus will pervade with me with LUCK.

I developed a new figure of speech called (thought (a) phor). For example: the word liberal has the antonyms strict and also conservative. Such a word which has two different antonyms is called a thoughtaphor.

I read into the Bible and I have coined two new idioms. Long after the death of the Pharaoh and after the reign of Joseph, the country was ruled by a Pharaoh who ill-treated the Jews. God started sending the 7 plagues in-order to let the Israelites go. But the Pharaoh remained adamant as ever. Then God asked the Semites to kill a goat or sheep and smear the blood on their doors and in the night the hand of God will visit the country and kill the entire first one born except the Jews. Smearing the door with blood means victory over one’s enemies. Yes, God will smear my door with blood. God also asked the captives in Egypt to have feast with unleavened bread known as the festival of the Passover. The Festival of the Passover means joy and wondrous rejoicing after a period of great trials and hardships in life.